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Psychology

Psychology

Psychology is the scientific study of the mind and behaviour.

Psychologists study how human beings think feel and act. They are interested in why we make decisions, why we like some people and not others and what makes us succeed and fail.

 


 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is Psychology?

Psychology is defined as the scientific study of the mind and behaviour. Psychologists study how human beings feel, act and think. They try to find out how we learn, understand, remember and forget things. They are interested in how we make decisions, why we like some people and not others, what makes us succeed and fail. They study these problems by both observation and experiment, involving both people and animals. For further insight to this subject explore the British Psychological Society website at http://www.bps.org.uk

What Can Psychology offer to students?

Psychology is one of the most fascinating sciences of the twenty-first century. The human mind was once the preserve of philosophy; now psychology helps unfathom the mind’s mysteries and has a multitude of real-world applications for example, how to improve memory for examinations.

Why Choose Psychology?

Psychology offers employability: Students may or may not choose to study psychology in Higher or Further Education, but either way, what is learnt on a psychology A level course will equip students for a range of courses. There is overlap with Biology, Medicine, Nursing, Social Sciences, Management Training, Teaching, Social Work, Police and Armed Forces.

Psychology is useful: Imagine if we knew enough about the way humans work to be able to intervene and reduce problems such as stress, eye witness memory, child development, mental illness, eating disorders, unhealthy lifestyles and depression. In addition to gaining understanding of the validity, reliability and ethics of Psychological and Social Science research Psychology is interesting and different. It complements a wide range of other subjects, both arts and sciences. It accesses all three key skill areas:

  • Communication; through written answers, essays, practical reports, discussion and independent learning projects.
  • Numeracy; through descriptive statistics at AS and inferential statistics in A2.
  • ICT; through word processing of essays and coursework reports, using e-mail for enquiry, statistical analysis, presentation of data and preparation of power presentations.

What Career Opportunities follow from studying Psychology?

Psychology is accepted by all universities as an academic A level. It has a wide variety of applications including medicine, management, marketing, business studies, personnel, nursing, physiotherapy, teaching, counselling, sports studies, clinical psychology, educational psychology, occupational psychology, forensic psychology, criminology, careers in the police force and armed services. Psychology fits well with a wide variety of subject combinations, for example biology (required by some universities to study psychology) English, religious studies, business studies, biology, geography, history, P.E., maths.

 


 

Clubs

Psychology Society Day 2 & 7 Lunch F3 Mrs Hughes/Miss Stanley/Miss Provost

 


 

What will I learn and what does the exam look like?

At AS the subject is examined via two written examinations as follows:

Paper 1 Introductory Topics in Psychology

1 hour 30 mins 50% of total AS level marks

A written paper covering the following areas: Social Influence, Memory, Attachment. It is 72 marks in total and includes three compulsory structured sections worth 24 marks each.

 

Paper 2 Psychology in Context

1 hour 30 mins 50% of total AS level marks

This is a written paper in which students are required to apply their knowledge and understanding to a range of psychology theories and concepts. It covers the following areas: Psychopathology, Approaches with Biopsychology and Research Methods. It is 72 marks in total and includes three compulsory structured sections worth 24 marks each.

 

At A Level the subject is examined via three written examinations as follows:

Paper 1 Introductory Topics in Psychology

2 hours 33.3% of total A level marks

A written paper covering the following areas: Social Influence, Memory, Attachment and Psychopathology. It is 96 marks in total and includes four compulsory structured sections worth 24 marks each.

 

Paper 2 Psychology in Context

2 hours 33.3% of total A level marks

This is a written paper in which students are required to apply their knowledge and understanding to a range of psychology theories and concepts. It covers the following areas: Psychopathology, Approaches, Biopsychology and Research Methods (double component). It is 96 marks in total and includes four compulsory structured sections worth 24 marks each.

 

Paper 3 Issues and Options in Psychology

2 hours 33.3% of the A-level marks

Students are required to complete one compulsory structured section plus three sections with optional topics. Each section is worth 24 marks each and it is 96 marks in total. The three topics students will cover include Gender, Schizophrenia and Aggression. The compulsory section will cover an issue or debate, for example, gender and culture bias or the nature-nurture debate. Pupils will only have to learn one issue or debate from this section.